Recipe Redo Blog

Traditional Recipes Redone…Healthier

Blackberry Cobbler

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Cobblers originated in the early British American colonies. English settlers were unable to make traditional suet puddings due to lack of suitable ingredients and cooking equipment, so instead covered a stewed filling with a layer of uncooked plain biscuits or dumplings, fitted together. When fully cooked, the surface has the appearance of a cobbled street. The name may also derive from the fact that the ingredients are “cobbled” together. This particular recipe has received a health make-over from Executive Chef Bobby Benjamin of La Coop in Louisville KY.

Dessert: Blackberry Cobbler
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Bake Time: approximately 20 minutes (until golden brown)
Yields: 4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups fresh blackberries
  • 2 oz. St. Germaine
  • ½ tsp. vanilla extract
  • 3T whole-wheat flour
  • 2T brown sugar
  • 4 tsp. canola oil
  • 2 tsp. local honey
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp. nutmeg

Directions:

  1. Heat oven to 375°F.
  2. Coat four 4oz. ramekins with cooking spray
  3. Combine berries, St. Germaine and vanilla in a bowl; toss well.
  4. In separate bowl combine remaining ingredients. Mix until moist and crumbly.
  5. Add berry-mixture to ramekins. Spread crumble onto the fruit mixture.
  6. Place the ramekins in the oven and bake the cobblers for approx. 20 minutes. (or until golden brown.)

Blackberry Cobbler Nutritional Value (per serving):
Total fat: 5g
Carbohydrates: 27g
Fiber: 5g
Protein: 3g

Author: Debra K

I believe we all have the right to enjoy incredible looking and tasting cuisine.

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